Automobiles and Roads in San Antonio
from 1944 to the present
Page under construction, June 2016

San Antonio leaders began serious planning for the post war era in 1944. The city was experiencing phenomenal population growth because of World War II. Existing military bases were expanded and new ones were developed, including Lackland Air Force Base, which grew from what had been a brush covered bomb aiming site to become a national training base for all enlisted air force personnel. As smaller towns already distressed by the Great Depression emptied across the region, as resident's moved to take secure, well paying jobs in San Antonio, the city’s population jumped from just over 230,000 in 1940 to well over 400,000. Planners knew that a much improved network of arterial roads would be needed to move the increasing numbers of residents if the city was to avoid gridlock once wartime travel restrictions and gasoline rationing were lifted.
San Antonio maps and aerial views

Aerial view of San Antonio, late 1940s
San Antonio map, 1947
Aerial view of Loop 410 / Fredericksburg Road interchange, 1963
Ih 10 / IH 35 in downtown San Antonio, 1968
Aerial view of downtown San Antonio, 1977
Aerial view of San Antonio, 1980
Aerial view of San Antonio, 1987
Aerial view of Loop 410 / US 281 interchange, 2013
Current San Antonio freeway map
San Antonio's actions were happening across the country. In 1944 Congress passed the most important piece of road related legislation since the original Federal Road Act of 1916. Reauthorized every four years, the 1944 FRA created a fourth tier of roads in the USA, intercity expressways, also known as interstate highways. The other three were urban, farm to market and highways between towns. The new roads were to be multi-lane, limited access highways that would bypass most urban areas except major cities where they would literally be bulldozed through. Some 40,000 miles were proposed, to be funded 50/50 by the Federal and individual state governments. Most people give 1956 as the date for the beginning of the interstate system but this ignores the many tolled highways, such as the New Jersey Turnpike, created before this date. Only one tolled road was created in Texas, between Dallas and Fort Worth. This became a “Freeway” as opposed to a “Tollway,” following the 1956 Act during the Eisenhower administration in 1956, when the funding mechanism became 90% Federal and 10% state.
San Antonio People and Cars

TxDOT magnetic debris cleaner, in the 1940s
Car being towed off of Houston Street, 1946
1947 Pontiac purchased from Mission City Pontiac, 830 Broadway, San Antonio, TX
Old postal service Chevrolet in San Antonio, 1947
Piggly Wiggly supermarket, San Antonio, 1948
Jeep spraying mosquitoes in San Antonio, 1948
Car being rescued from the S. St. Mary's railroad underpass, 1948
Filling an automobile radiator in San Antonio, 1949
Boys with the family sedan in Bexar County, 1950
Ford Model T near Gillespie Ford on Broadway, San Antonio, 1953
Lewis Birdsong Jr. and wife Betty with their 1955 Ford
Road signs for Bandera, 1955
State highway Survey in San Antonio, 1964
Modern Ford F150 hauling a 1929 Ford Model AA truck
Rearview mirror view on IH 10, San Antonio, 2010
Emergency service vehicles on Loop 410 at McCullough, 2014
Welcome to Texas road sign, El Paso
During the depression the federal government’s share of road construction costs had already risen from around 10% to almost half. Due to political pressures Congress emphasized spending on farm to market roads at the expense of limited access highways. As a result almost none existed outside of California and the northeast of the country in 1940. Of the 190,000 miles of roads in Texas, just 26,805 could be classified as interstate in nature and none were limited access. Most had only two lanes, “B” roads by today’s standards. Of the nation’s three million miles of roads only half had been graded, graveled and drained and therefore classifiable as all weather roads. With war once again on the horizon, plans for the nation's road network in 1940 proposed that 75,000 miles of the nation’s roads be designated strategic highways. Of these vital routes, 14,000 miles were found to be too weak and 4,000 miles too narrow. Over 24,000 bridges needed to be upgraded or replaced. Work on other roads was suspended to concentrate on urgently needed military projects. Fortunately the railroads were better prepared this time. The chaos during World War One was avoided and they carried the bulk of military supplies during the war, but suffered enormous wear and tear due to manpower and material shortages as did a great deal of the road network as well.
US 87 / IH 10 in San Antonio
US 87 (now IH 10) at Cincinatti under construction, San Antonio, 1948
Adding guard rails to US 87 (now IH 10) in San Antonio, 1950
US 87 (Now IH 10) in San Antonio, 1955
Bus stop on US 87 San Antonio, 1964, before the highway gained interstate status
Bus stop on US 87 San Antonio, 1964, before the highway gained interstate status
IH 10 in San Antonio, 1967, before the elvated sections were added to increase capacity
IH 10 in San Antonio, 1967
IH 10 in San Antonio, 1968
IH 10 at Roland in San Antonio, looking east, 2014
South Loop 410 / IH 10 interchange, looking west, 2010
IH 10 in San Antonio, heading west, 2010
IH 10 in San Antonio, heading west, 2010
IH 10 in San Antonio, heading west, 2010
IH 10 in San Antonio, heading west, 2010
IH 10 in San Antonio near downtown, heading west, 2010
IH 10 in San Antonio, heading west, 2010
IH 10 in San Antonio, heading west, 2010
IH 10 at Loop 410 in San Antonio, heading west, 2010
IH 10 near De Zavala in San Antonio, heading west, 2010
View of downtown San Antonio from IH 10, heading west, 2010
View of downtown San Antonio from IH 10, heading west, 2010
IH 10 under North Loop 1604 in San Antonio, a popular Park'n'Ride location, 2014
IH 10 at Kingsbury, looking towards Seguin and San Antonio, 2014
In 1949 a three-quarter mile section of San Antonio’s first urban freeway, US 87, now part of IH 10, opened between Martin Street and Woodlawn Avenue, quite a boost for the Handy Andy supermarket located there. As in the rest of the country, initial progress on this and other roads was greeted with enthusiasm. It would not be until the 1970s that people started pushing back against the construction of freeways which, up till then, bulldozed through existing communities if they were in the way with virtual impunity. A section of US 81, now IH 35, between Alamo Street and Broadway, was completed in 1956.
US 81 / IH 35 in San Antonio
US 81 (now IH 35) looking south at Pat Booker Road, just inside Loop 1604, around 1960. There is a modern church with three spires at this location to the left today.
US 81 (now IH 35) about ten miles north of San Antonio, around 1960. Retama Park occupies the land to the left today.
IH 10 / IH 35 interchange under construction in San Antonio, 1966
Official opening of IH 35 in San Antonio, 1962, one of the last sections of the highway to be upgraded to interstate standards
IH 35 at San Pedro, San Antonio, 2010
IH 35 at San Pedro, San Antonio, 2010
IH 35 at San Pedro, San Antonio, 2010
IH 35 at Wurzbach Parkway, looking south, San Antonio, 2014
IH 35 at Waters Street, looking south, San Antonio, 2014
Upgrades and extensions of the northern section of old Loop 13 began in 1957 and the result was renamed Loop 410. At around fifty miles in circumference, it was completed in 1967. The city’s first mall, initially called Wonderland then Crossroads and now Wonderland again, opened at the intersection of IH 10 and Loop 410 in Balcones Heights in 1960, changing the shopping habits of the city and putting further strain on downtown retailers. By 1964 IH 10 stretched from the eastern edge of the city all the way to De Zavala in the north-west.
Loop 410 in San Antonio
Loop 410 signs at Cherry Ridge, San Antonio, 2010
Loop 410, San Antonio, looking east from Cherry Ridge, 2010
Loop 410, San Antonio, looking west from Cherry Ridge to the IH 10 interchange, 2010
Vehicles on the ramp from entering Loop 410, San Antonio, from the IH 10 interchange, 2010
North Loop 410 at Cherry Ridge, San Antonio, looking east, 2010
North Loop 410 at Cherry Ridge, San Antonio, looking east, 2010
North Loop 410 at Cherry Ridge, San Antonio, looking west, 2010
Loop 410, San Antonio, in the rain, 2013
Loop 410 South at Houston, looking east, 2014
Loop 410 at 281, looking east, 2014
Loop 410 at Vance Jackson, looking east, 2014
The first section of Loop 1604, between IH 10 and Highway 281 was completed in 1958. The entire loop was completed in 1977. At just over 95 miles in length, it absorbed sections of a number of different roads as it was completed. As San Antonio continues to expand, Loop 1604 has gained many new lanes and improvements. New housing subdivisions and shopping centers on the north side, stretching from Highway 90 to IH 35, are being built at a frenetic pace as the city’s population heads to the one and a quarter million mark and beyond. By contrast much of the southern side is still a two lane highway, winding through the fertile farmland still to be found in south Bexar County. With the Toyota manufacturing plant, opened in 2006, acting like a magnet, and the new A & M University campus completed in 2009, it is only a mater of time before development takes over here as well.
Loop 1604 in San Antonio
Loop 1604 at IH 35 under construction, San Antonio
Loop 1604 and IH 35 interchange, San Antonio
North Loop 1604 in San Antonio, looking east
Loop 1604 near NW Military in San Antonio, looking west, 2010
Park'n'Ride parking under North Loop 1604 at IH10 in San Antonio, 2014
North Loop 1604 near Vance Jackson, San Antonio, looking west 2014
North Loop 1604 near Vance Jackson, San Antonio, looking east 2014
North Loop 1604 near Vance Jackson, San Antonio, looking east 2014
Incomplete HWY 281 interchange over North Loop 1604, San Antonio, looking east 2014
North Loop 1604 near Redland Road, San Antonio, looking east 2014
Following a national trend, the easy passage given to earlier projects, such as IH 35, which was allowed to cut through well established communities on the east side almost without comment, came to a screeching halt in the 1970s when plans for an extension of IH 37 from Corpus Christi to the International Airport and on towards Blanco was proposed. The initial route proposed by the Department of Transportation involved going through a small section of the south eastern corner of Olmos Park. The small city categorically denied permission, fearing both a loss of property values and a repetition of the bisection of Balcones Heights by IH 10. The second route was even less popular, as it involved going through the major green belt reserve in the Olmos Basin. As in other cities across the country, from New Orleans to Portland and, most famously, Boston, where halted projects are still called roads to nowhere, environmentalists and conservationists joined forced to stop the erosion of city parklands.
US 281 / IH 37 in San Antonio
IH 10 / IH 37 interchange under construction in San Antonio, 1966
US 281 / IH 57 at Commerce Street under construction, San Antonio, 1971
US 281 / IH 37 under construction in San Antonio, 1971
US 281 / IH 37 under construction in San Antonio, 1975
Southwest airlines jet over US 281 in 2001
Loop 1604 and HWY 281 interchange, San Antonio, before construction flyover bridges had begun
Loop 1604 and HWY 281 interchange, San Antonio, under construction
HWY 281 at Commerce Street, San Antonio, loking towards downtown, 2010
San Antonio skyline from IH 37, 2010
HWY 281 at ST. Mary.s looking south, San Antonio, 2014
HWY 281 downtown view, looking south, San Antonio, 2014
In San Antonio the charge was lead by the San Antonio Conservation Society, an organization with a long track record of resisting the depredations of the automobile age upon our historic city. It had successfully resisted the construction of parking structures under city parks and other schemes it deemed, at best, short sighted, but the ten year fight to protect the Omos Basin green belt would eventually prove unwinnable. Too many powerful forces were arrayed against them. The legal framework of the argument aginst the proejct rested on a provision within the national road construction statutes that forbade the use of parklands for federally funded expressways. However both Texan US Senators, Republican John Tower and Democrat Lloyd Bentsen, successfully passed legislation in 1973 that discontinued federal involvement in the project, which allowed the city and state to go it alone. This is why IH 37 technically ends at the intersection of IH 35 and the road continues as Texas Highway 281 even though it meets all the criteria of interstate highway construction.
The Conservation Society, drained of funds and locked in an unpopular struggle, bowed to the inevitable and the north central corridor, State Highway 281, was finally opened to the public in February 1978. It was probably a poor consolation to them when it was named one of the three “most beautiful” urban expressways by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials in 1981. Due to lack of funds and encroachment upon the needed land during the ten year delay, it would not be until 2008 that a non-surface road interchanges with Loops 410 was completed in 2008, costing far than it would have thirty years earlier. The interchange with 1604 is taking even longer. It was only partially completed as of 2014, thanks to lawsuits about its environmental impact pursued by opponents to the plan to add tolled lanes to HWY 281 outside the loop whih have prevented the ramps to the north of the loop being completed.
While we tend to think of freeways as ubiquitous, this is in fact only a reflection of how much we use them. Of San Antonio’s 5,150 miles of roads, only 211 miles, just 4.1% are limited access expressways. At the same time over 50% of all the miles driven in the city are made on these roads. This just goes to show how prescient the 1921 construction and funding compromise turned out to be. At that time, when arguments raged over which form of major roads should be given priority, it capped the amount of roads “interstate in nature” to 7% of the total in any state but allowed up to 60% of road spending to go towards them. (More more information on this, see previous chapter, linked from the right side column.)
Red McCombs

Red McCombs with an award at his San Antonio dealership
Red McCombs and August Hemphill adjusting the sign on their Ford dealership at 1025 San Pedro Avenue in San Antonio
Hemphill McCombs Ford dealership, 1025 San Pedro Avenue in San Antonio
Red McCombs pitching car deals on television in San Antonio
Promotional Red McCombs vehicle at the San Antonio Ford dealership
Red McCombs's "new" location on IH 10 outside Loop 410 in San Antonio
Red McCombs's "new" location on IH 10 outside Loop 410 in San Antonio
Fun Red McCombs advert to coincide with Hemisfair in 1968
Fun Red McCombs advert from 1970
Red McCombs Ford & Toyota, Ih 10, San Antonio
1924 Ford Model T truck at Red McCombs Ford, San Antonio
Red McCombs personal Ford Model T truck inside his used car dealership building in San Antonio, TX
San Antonio Dealerships

San Antonio Nash dealership, 2600 Broadway, 1950
Winerich Dealership on San Pedro Avenue in San Antonio, 1958
First sale of an Edsel in San Antonio at the Winerich Dealership on San Pedro Avenue, 1958
Edsel newspaper story in San Antonio at the Winerich Dealership on San Pedro Avenue, 1958
Tom Bwenson Chevrolet on S. St Marys, in the early 1960s
Mike Persia's Chevrolet dealership at St. Marys and Nueva in San Antonio, late 1950s
Mike Persia's Chevrolet dealership at 1505 SW Military in San Antonio
1972 national magazine Chevrolet advert with picture in front of the Alamo
Jordan Ford, San Antonio's oldest Ford dealership, 2010
Ford Model As at Jordan Ford, 2010
Independent car dealer, San Antonio, 2014
Gas Stations and car related businesses in San Antonio

San Antonio Gulf gas station, 1967
Valero gas station, San Antonio
Valero gas station pump, San Antonio, 2014
Exxon gas station, San Antonio, 2014
Shell gas station / McDonalds combination, San Antonio, 2014
Coastal gas station, San Antonio, 2014
Independent "Big Star" gas station, San Antonio, 2014
HEB gas station, San Antonio, 2014
CITGO gas station, San Antonio, 2014
Independent gas station, San Antonio, 2014
Former San Antonio Ford dealership building on East Houston now a parts store, 1947
Former King William Texaco gas station now a coffee shop
Independent tire and muffler store, San Antonio, 2014
Discount Tires store, San Antonio, 2014
Independent auto repair shop, San Antonio, 2014
Independent auto repair shop, San Antonio, 2014
Truck parts store, San Antonio, 2014
NAPA car parts store, San Antonio, 2014
CARQUEST car parts store, San Antonio, 2014
Modern Horses in San Antonio

1989 re-eanactment of nun's historic journey to found the Santa Rosa hospital in San Antonio
Rodeo clowns on horseback, Comfort, 1944
Hill Country trail ride in Comfort heading towards San Antonio, in the early 1990s
Trail riders heading towards San Antonio in 2007
Horse carriage on snow covered Alamo Plaza, 1987
Horse carriage near the Alamo, 2009
Kerrville street scenes

Water Street, Kerrville, in the 1950s
Piggly Wiggly store, Kerrville, in the 1950s
Kerrville, in the 1950s
San Antonio Street Scenes

Houston Street, San Antonio
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1944
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1944
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1944
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1944
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1944
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1944
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1945
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1948
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1950
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1950
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1950
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1950
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1957
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1960
Houston Street, San Antonio, 1961
Gunter Hotel on E. Houston, San Antonio, 1962
SAPD 1970s police car at the Alamo
Houston Street from Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 2010
Houston Street at Lasoya looking west, San Antonio, 2010
Houston Street at Lasoya looking east, San Antonio, 2010
Houston Street at St. Marys looking east, San Antonio, 2010
Houston Street at St. Marys looking west, San Antonio, 2010
Houston / HWY 1346 outside Loop 410, looking east, 2010
Commerce Street, San Antonio
Commerce Street, San Antonio, 1940
Commerce Street, San Antonio, 1946
Commerce Street, San Antonio, 1956
West Commerce Street, San Antonio, loking towards downtown, 2010
Commerce Street, San Antonio, 1970s
Commerce Street at Cherry, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street at Cherry, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street at Cherry, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street at Cherry, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street at Bowie, San Antonio, loking west, 2010
Commerce Street at Alamo Street, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Commerce Street, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
St. Mary's Street, San Antonio
N. St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, 1940's
N. St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, 1940's
N. St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, 1940's
N. St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, 1958
N. St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, 2005
N. St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, 2010
N. St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, 2010
S. St. Mary's Street, closed for "Siclovia" San Antonio, 2013
N. St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, 2014
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 1944
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 1946
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 1949
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 1950s
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 1950
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 1950s
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 2007
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 2010
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 2010
Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 2010
Alamo Street, San Antonio
N. Alamo Street from Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 2010
S. Alamo Street, looking north towards Alamo Plaza, San Antonio, 1962
S. Alamo at Presa, San Antonio, 1946
S. Alamo Street, looking north, San Antonio, 2010
S. Alamo Street, San Antonio, 2010
S. Alamo Street at Probandt, San Antonio, 2010
Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio
Piggly Wiggly at the corner of Fredericksburg Road and Cicinatti Avenue, San Antonio, circa 1945
Traffic on Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio, late 1950s
Fredericksburg Road south of IH 10, San Antonio, 2010
Fredericksburg Road looking south from IH 10, San Antonio, 2010
Fredericksburg Road looking north from IH 10, San Antonio, 2010
Downton San Antonio view from Fredericksburg Road, near Medical Drive, 2010
Other Downtown San Antonio Street Scenes
Augusta Street, San Antonio, 2010
Broadway looking north from Houston Street, San Antonio, 2010
View of downtown San Antonio from the Bueno Vista railroad bridge, 2014
N. Flores looking south, San Antonio, 2010
Main Plaza, San Antonio, 1947
Medina Street near the old Missouri Pacific railroad station, San Antonio, 2010
W. Msrket Street near downtown San Antonio, 2010
Navarro Street, San Antonio, 1947
Nueva Street, looking towards the Bexar County Court House, San Antonio, 2010
N. Presa near downtown San Antonio, looking south, 2010
Suburban Street Scenes, San Antonio
Augusta Street in the King WIlliam district, San Antonio, 2010
Austin Highway, San Antonio, looking east, 1959
Arsenal Street, San Antonio, 2010
Ford Model Ts on Broadway, San Antonio, 2008
Callaghan Road, east of IH 10, looking east, San Antonio, 2010
Callaghan Road, east of IH 10, looking west, San Antonio, 2010
N. Colorado Street, San Antonio, looking towards Commerce Street, 2014
N. Colorado Street, San Antonio, looking towards Commerce Street, 2014
San Anton Arts Center on El Paso Street, San Antonio, 2013
Trees forming a canopy over Fallen Leaf Lane, San Antonio, 2014
Fredericksburg Road Art deco district, San Antonio, 2014
Police office directing winter traffic at Five Points, San Antonio, 1961
Snow on S. Laredo Street, San Antonio, 1950
N. Main, San Antonio, 2014
N. Main at Lexington, San Antonio, 2014
McCullough, looking towards downtown San Antonio, 2014
SE Military Drive/ Loop 13 near Houston Street, San Antonio, 2010
Nacogdoches looking south, San Antonio, 2010
HEB opening its first modern store in San Antonio on Nogalitos Steet, 1945
S. Presa looking north towards downtown San Antonio, 2014
S. Presa looking south, San Antonio, 2014
Decorated river bridge on Probandt, San Antonio, 2010
Old Seguin Road / HWY 78 in Kirby, San Antonio, 2014
Steves Road river bridge under IH35, San Antonio, 2010
Walzem Road looking east from IH 35, San Antonio, 2014
Washington Street, San Antonio, 2010
Traffic on Wetmore Road, San Antonio, 2006
San Antonio railroad grade crossings, bridges and underpasses
Railroad grade crossing at S. Alamo and Probandt, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad grade crossing at Broadway and Wetmore, San Antonio, 2008
Railroad grade crossing at Broadway and Wetmore, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad grade crossing at Broadway and Wetmore, San Antonio, 2008
Railroad grade crossing at Sunset Station on Commerce Street, 2014
Bridge over the railroad at the old Missouri Pacific station, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Railroad grade crossing near the old Missouri Pacific station under the Commerce Street rail bridge, San Antonio, loking east, 2014
Railroad grade crossing at Culebra, near Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad grade crossing at Dreamland, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad crossing at Fredericksburg Road south of IH 10, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad crossing at Fredericksburg Road and IH 10, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad grade crossing at Gibbs Sprawl at Walzem Road, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad bridge over Gibbs Sprawl, San Antonio, 2014
Hays Street bridge, San Antonio, 2010
Looking east towards Hays Street from the bridge, San Antonio, 2010
Hays Street bridge crossing Cheery Street, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad bridge over and under IH 10 near Cincinatti, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad bridge over and under IH 10 near Frericksburg Road, San Antonio, 2010
Rail grade crossing on Graf Road opposite Mission San Juan, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad under Loop 410 and grade crossing at Jackson Keller, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad under Loop 410 at Kirby Yard, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad bridge over North Loop 1604 near Vance Jackson, San Antonio, 2010 2014
Railroad bridge under Judson Road bridge, from Lookout Road, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad grade crossing at W. Martin, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad grade crossing at McCullough, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad grade crossing at McCullough, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad Bridge over Old O'Connor Road at Lookout Road, San Antonio, 2014
Railroad grade crossing on Probandt at Lone Star, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad underpass on Roosevelt Avenue, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad underpass on Roosevelt Avenue, San Antonio, 2010
Railroad underpass on San Pedro, San Antonio, 2010
Rail tracks under Loop 410 at Villamain Road San Antonio, 2014
Private Road grade crossing on Villamain Road San Antonio, 2014
Railroad grade crossing at Walzem Road at IH 35, San Antonio, 2014
Wurzbach Parkway bridge over the railroad and Wetmore Road, San Antonio, 2010

 

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